Publiboda

Honeymoon in Namibia

Immense, beautiful, otherworldly, inspirational...

At approximately 824,000 square kilometers, Namibia is immense even by African standards. But it’s what occupies this seemingly endless amount space that makes it special. Namibia is filled with rugged, beautiful landscapes of every kind creating an otherworldly environment from which an amazing wealth of wildlife has adapted and thrived. It’s perfect for nature lovers. For adventure or solace seekers. And for people looking to be inspired long after their departure.photo by Chtrede

What to see

Windhoek

Perhaps by accident or a stroke of meticulous German planning, Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, is located at the geographic center of the country surrounded by rolling mountains. It’s not only the perfect place to start or finish your holiday, but well worth a visit in its own right.

The influence of German colonization is still present in language, architecture and restaurants where one can savor traditional dishes, bread and beer, and even celebrate Oktoberfest if the timing is right. During the day the city center has a European café culture feel, laid-back and eclectic, with a pedestrian precinct, bustling shops and market stalls. It all makes for great people watching, and due to Namibia’s complex and intertwined history, you will see people of all colors and cultures. From the fairest blond to striking women in traditional dress - all seem to possess a wonderful sense of pride, hope and ambition.

Away from the cafes, guided tours are available of many of Windhoek’s main attractions, including Namibia’s National Museaum at Alte Feste (Old Fort), the Christuskirche (Christ Church) of the Lutheran parish from the year 1896, and Katutura. This suburb built on South Africa’s apartheid policy in the 1950’s is now a crowded mix of people from different cultures living together in peace and harmony. The same can be said of the entire city.

The Skeleton Coast

Once upon a time the entire coastline of Namibia was called The Skeleton Coast. Today, the moniker mostly refers to the Skeleton National Park, which stretches the northern one-third of Namibia’s shore. The landscape in the park ranges from wind swept dunes to rugged canyons with walls of richly colored volcanic rock and extensive mountain ranges.

The park’s ominous name is well earned given the scores of shipwrecks littering the beaches – the work of the Benguela Current, dense fog and rough surf. Bleached whale and seal bones also are visible back from days when the whaling industry was still active. But despite its appearance, the Skeleton National Park houses a great variety of species with its borders – big cats, desert-adapted elephant, black rhino and many more.

You’re best to fly-in to see everything, especially the vast display of shipwrecks, but you can also enter between the Ugab and Hoanib rivers and enjoy the coast’s superb fishing area. 

Kalahari

The world’s largest continuous stretch of sand, the Kalahari Desert isn’t technically desert at all. Thanks to a modest measure of rainfall the landscape is well vegetated with a variety of trees, shrubs, camelthorn, red ebony and other acacias. In springtime the plains are covered in blankets of flowers and grass while the summer rains bring a fair share of greenery.

This physical beauty only enhances the real, true allure of the Kalahari – the liberating silence and solitude found in so much open space. Visitors describe their visit as an almost spiritual experience and emotionally enriching.

And of course, no visit here is complete without meeting the proud San Bushmen. Tour operators will respectfully make such introductions with the tribe where you can learn about their traditions, origins and knowledge of living in the bushveld. In some cases you can still listen to their unique use of ‘click’ language, a wonderful experience in itself. 

Wildlife

The ruggedness of the Namibian landscape has obviously done nothing to deter both flora and fauna from adapting and thriving here. The shear abundance and variety of wildlife of all sizes is staggering. From big game such as lion, elephant, giraffe, cheetah and rhino to a wealth of small game and even many endemic species like the black-faced impala – the quest to see it up close is easily the nation’s top tourist pursuit. One that is rarely unfulfilled thanks to conservation efforts and an amazing network of national parks and conservancies.

Culture

Namibia is truly unique, influenced by various cultures during colonization, and now reborn from the shadows of Apartheid in 1990. What has emerged is a true sense of unity in diversity – the coming together of at least 11 major ethnic groups, each celebrating their past while working together toward the future. You’ll notice this in dress, language, art, music, sport, food and religion. There exists a wonderful collage, but first and foremost, Namibians are proud to be Namibian. And for good reason.photo by 	  Hans Stieglitz

Geography

Part of the allure of Namibia is that it’s four countries in one. Four different landscapes, each with its own characteristics and attractions. The most definitive is the Namib, a long coastal desert that runs the length of the country and is highlighted with migrating dune belts, dry riverbeds and canyons. The central plateau is home the majority of Namibia towns and villages and is divided between rugged mountain ranges and sand-filled valleys. Next is the vast Kalahari Desert with its ancient red sand and sparse vegetation. Finally, Kavango and Caprivi, blessed with generous amounts of rain and typified by tropical forests, perennial rivers and woodland savannahs.

Climate

This is Africa and the climate reflects it. But just as Namibia is filled with contrasting geography, equivalent climactic differences do apply depending on your location.

Partially covered by the Namib, one of the world's driest deserts, Namibia's climate is generally very dry and pleasant. The cold Benguela current keeps the coast cool, damp and free of rain for most of the year. Inland, all the rain falls in summer (November to April). January and February are hot, when daytime temperatures in the interior can exceed 40ºC (104ºF), but nights are usually cool. Winter nights can be fairly cold, but days are generally warm and quite nice.

photo by Ltz Raptor

History

The history of this land can be found carved into rock paintings found to the south and in Twyfelfontein, some dating back to 26,000 B.C. A long lineage of various groups including San Bushmen, Bantu herdsmen and finally the Himba, Herero and Nama tribes among others – have been making this rugged land home for thousands of years.

But, as Namibia has one of the world’s most barren and inhospitable coastlines, it wasn’t until the middle of the nineteenth century that explorers, ivory hunters, prospectors and missionaries began to journey into its interior. Beyond these visitors, Namibia was largely spared the attentions of European powers until the end of the 19th century when it was colonized by Germany.

The colonization period was marred by many conflicts and rebellions by the pre-colonial Namibia population until WWI when it abruptly ended upon Germany’s surrender to the South African expeditionary army. In effect, this transition only traded one colonial experience for another.

In 1966 the South West Africa People's Organisation (SWAPO) launched the war for liberation for the area soon-named Namibia. The struggle for independence intensified and continued until South Africa agreed in 1988 to end its Apartheid administration. After democratic elections were held in 1989, Namibia became an independent state on March 21, 1990.

To date, Namibia boasts a proud record of uninterrupted peace and stability for all to enjoy.

Source: www.namibiatourism.com.na

Related articles:

  • None was find
Your comments

Comments (0)






Allowed tags: <b><i><br>Add a new comment:


Advertising

We recommend