Publiboda

Israel honeymoon

Your honeymoon in Israel: the saltiest sea on earth, ancient biblical cities, desert treks, diving and Mediterranean beaches...

Israel’s Special Attractions

Nothing underscores the variety of Israel’s attractions more than realizing that within a few hours you can go from the snowy heights of Mount Hermon to the Judean Desert and the saltiest sea on earth, the Dead Sea, while visiting ancient biblical cities, covered markets and a high-rise metropolis on the way. This is what makes Israel truly a destination with something for everyone.

jerusalemIn Israel you have to use the word “old” sparingly – the age of most of its cities is counted not in decades or in centuries, but in millennia. The ingenuity and complexity of some of these historical gems have won them a place on the prestigious UNESCO World Heritage List. And of course, Jerusalem is an incomparable highlight that is both historical and spiritual. Restored 19th century villages like Rosh Pina in the Upper Galilee and Zichron Ya’akov on Mount Carmel reveal another side of Israel – its pioneering days. Shops along these streets feature local arts and crafts that make the best gifts. They are often artist-owned as well, which holds the promise of getting to know some very interesting folks.

There’s no place like Tel Aviv to indulge your urban tastes. Classified by geographers as a “world city,” it offers museums, opera, theater and dance, fine restaurants with cuisines from around the world, its own beautifully restored 19th-century quarter, Neve Tzedek and even antiquities, in the form of its “older sister” – Jaffa, which also has galleries galore.

Tel Aviv’s Mediterranean location also means quality beach-time can be part of the experience. As for other beaches, there’s variety there, too: the sand on Ashkelon’s fine-grained shores has been buffeted by the waves all the way from the Nile Delta, while in the north, rocky and romantic coves sprout lovely wildflowers in their season. At the Caesarea beach, divers can take an underwater tour of the Roman antiquities. And for fresh-water fun, head for Tiberias and the Kinneret.

Another kind of diving experience stars at Israel’s Red Sea Riviera on the Gulf of Eilat where a wonder-sea of corals and exotic fish awaits. In addition to hiking and diving, other adventure challenge experiences are to be had in the desert cliffs around Eilat and in the Negev and the forested ridges of the Upper Galilee, including cycling, off-road touring and rappelling. Even those snowy heights are not one-dimensional: in the winter they boast ski-runs with all the amenities, but when the snow melts, Mount Hermon becomes a hiker’s delight with trails to charming alpine-like meadows and shady streams.

Israel boasts a number of unique edutainment attractions that families love – Jerusalem’s Time Elevator, Mini Israel, the new Kings City in Eilat and the Haganah Museum are only a few of the fun-while-you-learn experiences in store.

Lodgings come in all shapes and sizes, from fine international chains to budget hotels and – great for the family or a romantic interlude – country-style bed-and-breakfast accommodations.

Plan your trip around the date of one of Israel’s many annual international events - whether music, sports, theater or film – and see how all the wonderful pieces fit perfectly together.

israel honeymoon

Food & Wine

Like the United States, Israel is an ethnic melting pot of cultures, religions and immigrants. As a result, the food scene in Israel is extraordinarily diverse and also of a very high standard. 80% of Israelis are Jews of whom more than half were born in Israel. But most of their parents, grandparents or great grandparents came to Israel from more than 120 countries, bringing with them foods, recipes and food traditions from six continents. And the 20% of non-Jewish Israelis have their own food traditions too. Israel is also a part of the Western world, and very little happens in Los Angeles, London, Tokyo and Paris that doesn’t find its way to Israel within a few weeks. Put all this together and you have the ingredients for one of the most dynamic, fascinating – and delicious – food scenes in the world.

If you’d ask an Israeli 25 or 30 years ago what is the country’s typical fare, chances are the answer would be felafel, humus, tehina, with a side order of couscous or gefilte fish. A lot has happened in 25 or 30 years. All these dishes still exist, of course, indeed the first four are ubiquitous. But Israel has it all now, from hamburgers (Israel’s first McDonald’s opened in the 90s) to pizza to sushi (more sushi restaurants per capita in Tel Aviv than in any city on earth, including Tokyo), to the cuisines of India and China, to some of the finest influences of Paris, Brussels, Lyon, Barcelona and New York – the Israel food scene is utterly sophisticated and in step with the latest trends. Many of Israel’s leading chefs have studied, prepped, apprenticed at some of the finest restaurants in the world.

But there’s more. There are restaurants in Israel that serve cuisines that exist nowhere else on earth: particularly the cuisines from areas now devoid of Jews, where large Jewish populations created their own eclectic cuisines, such as in Salonika, Dubrovnik, Tripolitania, Mesopotamia, Persia, Yemen and Bukhara.

There are two elements that make food in Israel so unique. One is our location on the shores of the Mediterranean. Like Turkey, Greece, Italy, France and Spain, our cuisine reflects the warm sun, the olives that grow on our trees, the olive-oil we press, and the breads, fish and meats that have made the Mediterranean the source of what is considered by many as the world’s healthiest diet and, quite simply, the source of the best things to eat. Secondly, Israel produces the most splendid quality of fruits, vegetables and dairy products. From the legendary Jaffa oranges first exported to Europe in the 1930’s, to the kiwis, star fruit, citrus, tomatoes, peppers, flowers, yoghurts and cheeses we export today.

Health Tourism

Israel is fortunate to have a number of very attractive resorts frequented by tourists concerned about their health. Its widespread hot springs, sophisticated spa hotels and sunny climate make Israel a country that can offer its visitors a vacation focusing on their health, or a one-day visit to a health resort as part of the tour. The Dead Sea tops the list of therapeutic resorts, and is famous for its high concentration of salts and minerals.

courtesy of www.goisrael.comA health problem is only one reason to visit one of the spa resorts. Normally, all these resorts satisfy the desire for a break from everyday life, whether you visit them for one day or for a longer vacation.

The main therapeutic resorts are located in the vicinity of Lake Kineret and the Dead Sea. But there are other therapeutic resorts throughout the country. Most of the natural therapeutic resorts, as well as, of course, the spa resorts, offer the possibility of combining your visit with a range of holistic treatments. In recent years, the field of alternative medicine has developed rapidly in Israel. Among the treatments offered are water therapy (hydrotherapy), ayurvedic medicine (Indian medicine), and conventional massages. Next to most of the therapeutic resorts are hotels offering special vacation packages that include treatments and pampering, as well as board and lodging. 

Rural Tourism

Throughout Israel, from north to south, in kibbutzim and moshava farming communities, in towns, villages, community settlements and every beautiful corner of the country, pampering guest rooms with all the accessories have been built to offer you a rustic vacation, far from the noisy cities and close to nature, an arms length from Israel’s primal landscapes and wonders. There is a saying that in order to really get to know a country, you have to live among its inhabitants, learn their customs, chat with the locals and learn how they live. Perhaps this is the reason behind Israel’s flourishing rural tourism and its increasing popularity among tourists.

The rural experience will provide you with an opportunity to see the far-flung communities and meet their residents, most of whom are farmers who welcome you and offer you charming vacation rooms and suites, right next to their fields and in their orchards. These accommodations are also located near many historical sites and attractions, so that you can quickly and easily reach every part of the country, while at the same time learning about the different types of communities and various life styles.

Rural tourism has developed considerably in recent decades and now offers a warm alternative that includes accommodations in a rustic atmosphere in the heart of nature, with delicious meals from the best of the local produce.

There is a wide range of guest rooms, family vacation units or pampering wooden cabins with breathtaking views of the landscape, either scattered among the green fields of kibbutzim or perched on mountaintops and hillsides, in the heart of orchards and pine groves, along the beach or beside rivers. Some cabins come with wonderful surprises, such as double Jacuzzis and scented candles for a romantic atmosphere, while others offer agricultural activities, such as harvesting fruit in season, a visit to the cowshed or sheepfold, horseback riding, a ride in a wagon drawn by a tractor, visits to fruit and vegetable packing plants and olive oil or wine presses. There are also swimming pools, playground equipment for children and hammocks, for relaxing with a view of the horizon. All you have to do is give yourself up to the quiet pastoral surroundings and sink into never-ending tranquility.

Camel and rider (photo Rafael Ben Ari)

Shabbat

Even though this is the seventh day of every week (counting from Sunday), and there are over 50 such days each year, Shabbat is a holy day - and even one of the most important holy days in Judaism. In fact, apart from the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), Shabbat is the holiest day for Jews, and is the only one mentioned in the Ten Commandments.

The observance of Shabbat has always been central to the Jewish people’s experience and existence, at least until recent generations. A well-known saying states that more than the Jewish people have kept Shabbat, Shabbat has kept the Jewish people.

According to ancient Jewish tradition, Shabbat has a clear connection to the creation of the world: on the seventh day God rested (“Shabbat,” in Hebrew) from the work of creation, so this is a holy day for men, and they, too, are to rest from productive work.

The idea of Shabbat - one day sanctified for rest after six days of toil - is one of the important contributions of Judaism to world culture. It is also the basis for the concept of the week as a cyclical unit of time. The Jewish Shabbat served as a model for the setting of the holy day for Christians (Sunday) and for Muslims (Friday).

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

All public offices in Israel are closed on Shabbat, as are most private businesses. Public transportation (trains and buses in most cities) do not operate, and in many places it is not easy to find an open restaurant. On the other hand, radio and TV broadcasts operate as usual.

In areas where most of the population is secular, such as Tel Aviv and most of its surrounding towns, Shabbat is expressed mainly in minimal business activity and transportation. Many secular families leave the cities on Shabbat, for relaxation and recreation in natural surroundings. In religious neighborhoods, on the other hand (including large sections of Jerusalem), the religious character of Shabbat as a holy day is observed to the fullest. Many streets are closed to traffic and alternative bypass routes must be found to travel from one place to another.

Source: www.goisrael.com

Related articles:

Your comments

Comments (0)






Allowed tags: <b><i><br>Add a new comment:


Advertising

We recommend