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Malaysia honeymoon

Cultural and geographical diversity in Malaysia, a land of extreme contrasts...

Multiculturalism has not only made Malaysia a gastronomical paradise, it has also made Malaysia home to hundreds of colorful festivals. It's no wonder that we love celebrating and socializing. As a people, Malaysians are very laid back, warm and friendly.

Geographically, Malaysia is as diverse as its culture. There are two parts to the country, 11 states in the peninsula of Malaysia and two states on the northern part of Borneo. Cool hideaways are found in the highlands that roll down to warm, sandy beaches and rich, humid mangroves.

malaysia honeymoon

One of Malaysia's key attractions is its extreme contrasts. Towering skyscrapers look down upon wooden houses built on stilts, and five-star hotels sit several meters away from ancient reefs.

For the perfect holiday full of surprises, eclectic cultures and natural wonders, the time is now, the place is Malaysia.

Weddings & Honeymoons

Malaysia has many exquisite locations for celebrating dream weddings or spending a blissful honeymoon with your new spouse.

Having your wedding in Malaysia is quite a straightforward affair. However, you would probably want to start first by researching your own country’s marriage requirements. For requirements on the Malaysian side, a good place to begin would be the Malaysian diplomatic mission in your country.

Rest assured that there is an abundance of wedding coordinators who can organize traditional Chinese, Malay, Indian or Western weddings. There are also beautiful places of worship in which to conduct religious ceremonies of any kind.

Need a wedding planner? Check out also the Association of Wedding Professionals Malaysia at www.awpmalaysia.org. Look them up, and find the (much!) needed help in organizing your fairytale wedding, and honeymoon getaway in Malaysia!

Aside from wedding coordinators, Malaysia also has some of the best wedding industry professionals, from photographers to make-up artists, from fashion designers to florists. Once the 'I Do's' are sealed, skip over to one of our beautiful islands for the perfect honeymoon.

A couple can feel like they are the only two people on our incredible islands, as you unwind from the wedding together, wrapped in sweet nothings. Indulge in world-class spas built for couples, and fun seaside activities galore. If you are looking for a fantasy wedding and the most memorable honeymoon, the time is now, the place is Malaysia.

Diving

Malaysia is fast becoming one of the leading dive destinations of the world with one of the richest marine environments in the Indo-Pacific Basin. The incredible bio-diversity of marine life, coupled with beautiful islands, white sandy beaches and clear warm waters, keeps divers coming back time and time again.

Top dive sites around Malaysia include diverse underwater geography such as sloping reefs, coral blocks, wall dives, deep dives, drift dives and wreck dives. A dip below the warm sea’s surface guarantees you an astounding experience, with a concentration of vibrant and exotic marine life rarely rivaled anywhere else in the world.

 

From schooling Hammerhead Sharks, to huge schools of barracudas and various species of turtles, to the bizarre Frogfish and Ghost Pipefish, there is always something fascinating awaiting you. It's no exaggeration to say that almost every time a marine bio-diversity survey is conducted in Malaysia’s tropical seas, the species list increases!

Dive centers in Malaysia are numerous, well equipped and certified by all the internationally recognized dive agencies like PADI, SSI and SSAC for maintaining their standards of safety and professionalism. Naturally, all scuba diving courses in Malaysian waters are also endorsed by these certifying agencies.

malaysia honeymoon
After completing your scuba course, get outfitted with the latest scuba equipment as all international brands are available from dive centers in Malaysia. Almost all the islands in Malaysia cater to divers of all levels of experience - be it easy, shallow drift-diving, to advanced wreck-diving or technical diving.

Located in the heart of the Indo-Pacific basin, the heart of the world's richest marine biodiversity area, Malaysia also offers pristine beaches and professional dive centers for the pleasure and safety of the advanced and novice diver. For a most memorable diving holiday, the time is now, the place is Malaysia.

Food

Malaysian food is not one particular kind of food but a unique culinary spectrum originating from Malaysia's multi-ethnic population that has melded together sampling tastes, ingredients and cooking methods from each other.

Malaysians relish and celebrate their diverse food choices. It is not uncommon to drive for hours to eat a really good bowl of noodles. As you can imagine, eatery standards are very competitive all over the country.

Each state in Malaysia has something different to offer in terms of culinary delights. Kuala Lumpur has the most diverse offering of foods from all over the world. Indulge in gourmet fusion cuisine created by talented chefs in designer restaurants, or sample an endless amount of goodies found practically bursting out of malls, store fronts and side-street hawker stalls.

Melaka is also home to delicious Baba Nyonya food, much of it served in quaint cafes in historical shophouses. Penang is hawker stall haven, where the most delicious food requires you to wait for al fresco tables and costs as little as RM3.50 per dish. Ipoh receives many day trippers who come only to savour local favourites.

Kelantan is the cradle of Malay culture and serves exotic Malay food rich in flavor and color. When trying to decide on what stall or restaurant to visit, the rule of thumb is that the most popular place, especially among the locals, is normally the best.

This multi-cultural array of food has now come to be known all over the world as Malaysian Food. For gastronomic adventures fit for kings, the time is now, the place is Malaysia.

Nature and biodiversity

Malaysia is an amazing country with countless abundance of biodiversity. It is not surprising to find that 75 percent of Malaysia’s land area remains forested, with 60 percent virgin rainforest, unchanged for millions of years.

The country is bestowed with numerous natural attractions such as amazing and diverse flora and fauna, white sandy beaches, exotic marine aqua life, dense rainforests and the oldest and largest caves in the world.

Unlock the mysteries of Malaysia, one of the twelve mega-biologically diverse countries in the world, which boasts at least 15,000 species of flowering plants, 286 species of mammals, 150,000 species of invertebrates, and 4,000 species of fishes in addition to the countless micro-organisms.

Experience a huge range of outdoor activities, such as caving, hiking, jungle trekking, white water rafting, rock climbing, bird watching, river cruising and much more.

Catch a glimpse of the largest flower in the world, Rafflesia, play with the endangered orang utans, visit the world’s largest single cave passage discovered at Mulu National Park or hike up Fraser’s Hill to catch the migrating birds.

Experienced outdoor professionals, who are well equipped with the latest gear, can guide you through all of these activities. If you are looking for rich and exotic ecotourism experiences in balmy tropical weather, the time is now, the place is Malaysia.

Culture & Heritage: People

Having had an interesting past and being a part of the international spice route many hundreds of years ago, Malaysia has turned into a mosaic of cultures. Everything from its people to its architecture reflect a colorful heritage and an amalgamated culture. To understand Malaysian culture, you must first get to know its people.

DISCOVER A LAND OF INTRIGUING DIVERSITY

Malays, Chinese, Indians and many other ethnic groups have lived together in Malaysia for generations. All these cultures have influenced each other, creating a truly Malaysian culture.

The largest ethnic groups in Malaysia are the Malays, Chinese and Indians. In Sabah and Sarawak, there are a myriad of indigenous ethnic groups with their own unique culture and heritage.

MALAY
Today, the Malays, Malaysia's largest ethnic group, make up more than 50% of the population. In Malaysia, the term Malay refers to a person who practices Islam and Malay traditions, speaks the Malay language and whose ancestors are Malays. Their conversion to Islam from Hinduism and Theravada Buddhism began in the 1400s, largely influenced by the decision of the royal court of Melaka. The Malays are known for their gentle mannerisms and rich arts heritage.

CHINESE
The second largest ethnic group, the Malaysian Chinese form about 25% of the population. Mostly descendants of Chinese immigrants during the 19th century, the Chinese are known for their diligence and keen business sense. The three sub-groups who speak a different dialect of the Chinese language are the Hokkien who live predominantly on the northern island of Penang; the Cantonese who live predominantly in the capital city Kuala Lumpur; and the Mandarin-speaking group who live predominantly in the southern state of Johor.

INDIAN
The smallest of three main ethnic groups, the Malaysian Indians form about 10% of the population. Most are descendants of Tamil-speaking South Indian immigrants who came to the country during the British colonial rule. Lured by the prospect of breaking out of the Indian caste system, they came to Malaysia to build a better life. Predominantly Hindus, they brought with them their colorful culture such as ornate temples, spicy cuisine and exquisite sarees.

INDIGENOUS ETHNIC GROUPS

Orang Asli
Orang Asli is a general term used for any indigenous groups that are found in Peninsular Malaysia. They are divided into three main tribal groups: Negrito, Senoi and Proto-Malay. The Negrito usually live in the north, the Senoi in the middle and the Proto-Malay in the south. Each group or sub-group has its own language and culture. Some are fishermen, some farmers and some are semi-nomadic.

SARAWAK

Collectively known as the Dayaks, the Iban, Bidayuh and Orang Ulu are the major ethnic groups in the state of Sarawak. Dayak, which means upstream or inland, is used as a blanket term by the Islamic coastal population for over 200 tribal groups. Typically, they live in longhouses, traditional community homes that can house 20 to 100 families.

Iban
The largest of Sarawak's ethnic groups, the Ibans form 30% of the state's population. Sometimes erroneously referred to as the Sea Dayaks because of their skill with boats, they are actually an upriver tribe from the heart of Kalimantan. In the past, they were a fearsome warrior race renowned for headhunting and piracy. Traditionally, they worship a triumvirate of gods under the authority of Singalang Burung, the bird-god of war. Although now mostly Christians, many traditional customs are still practised.

Bidayuh
Peace-loving and easy-going, the gentle Bidayuh of Sarawak are famous for their hospitality and tuak or rice wine. Making their homes in Sarawak's mountainous regions, they are mostly farmers and hunters. In their past headhunting days, their prized skulls were stored in a 'baruk' a roundhouse that rises about 1.5 meters above the ground. Originally animists, now most of them have converted to Christianity.

Orang Ulu
Also known as upriver tribes of Sarawak. Forming roughly 5.5% of Sarawak's population, there are over 100,000 different Orang Ulu tribes. Arguably Borneo's most artistic people, their large longhouses are ornately decorated with murals and superb woodcarvings; their utensils are embellished with intricate beadwork; and aristocratic ladies cover their bodies with finely detailed tattoos.

 

SABAH

The largest indigenous ethnic groups of Sabah's population are the Kadazan Dusun, the Bajau and the Murut.

Kadazan Dusun
The largest ethnic group of Sabah, the Kadazan Dusuns form about 30% of the state's population. Actually consisting of two tribes; the Kadazan and the Dusun, they were grouped together as they both share the same language and culture. However, the Kadazan are mainly inhabitants of flat valley deltas, which are conducive to paddy field farming, while the Dusun traditionally lived in the hilly and mountainous regions of interior Sabah.

Bajau
The second largest ethnic group in Sabah, the Bajaus make up about 15% of the state's population. Historically a nomadic sea-faring people that worshipped the Omboh Dilaut or God of the Sea, they are sometimes referred to as the Sea Gypsies. Those who chose to leave their sea-faring ways became farmers and cattle-breeders. These land Bajaus are nicknamed 'Cowboys of the East' in tribute to their impressive equestrian skills, which are publicly displayed in the annual Tamu Besar festival at Kota Belud.

Murut
The third largest ethnic group in Sabah the Muruts make up about 3% of the state's population. Traditionally inhabiting the northern inland regions of Borneo, they were the last of Sabah's ethnic groups to renounce headhunting. Now, they are mostly shifting cultivators of hill paddy and tapioca, supplementing their diet with blowpipe hunting and fishing. Like most indigenous tribes in Sabah, their traditional clothing is decorated with distinctive beadwork.

Source: www.tourism.gov.my

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